Memory & Countermemory: Memorialization of an Open Future

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Auchter | Beal | Bilinsky | Broyles | Coleman | Cowles | Ekin | Grobmeier | Hall | Johnston | Kleinberg | Paulesc | Mann | Ricketts | Sargent | Schick | Williams


Jessica Auchter is a doctoral student in political science and a graduate teaching associate in the School of Politics and Global Studies at the Tempe campus. Her doctoral studies focus on the politics of memory, with Dr. Roxanne Doty.

Bree Beal is pursuing a Master of Arts in the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, Interdisciplinary Studies program. He is participating in a fall 2011 graduate course connected to the symposium theme.

Stephanie Bilinsky is a doctoral student in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Religious Studies program. She is participating in a fall 2011 graduate course connected to the symposium theme.

Michael Broyles is pursuing a Master of Arts in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Religious Studies program. He is participating in a fall 2011 graduate course connected to the symposium theme.

Diana Coleman is a graduate teaching associate in the School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies at the Tempe campus. She is a doctoral student studying Islam in Global Context. Language study and research projects have taken her to Morocco and Indonesia, and she is currently at work on the uses (presence and functions) of religion at Guantanamo Bay Naval Base for the prisoner and prison guard populations.

Cindy Tekobbe Cowles is a graduate teaching associate in the Department of English at the Tempe campus and a doctoral student Rhetoric, Composition and Linguistics. She is currently studying digital literacies, collective identity, memory and culture work, and theories of emergent media and networks under the direction of Dr. Keith Miller and is a student of post-Holocaust Ethics with Dr. Martin Matustik. Post-Hololcaust ethics project: a persistent memory

Theresa Ekin is pursuing a Master of Arts in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Religious Studies program. She is participating in a fall 2011 graduate course connected to the symposium theme.

Greg Grobmeier graduated from the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the West campus, with a Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies, with concentrations in religious studies and philosophy of religion. He is currently a doctoral student at the University of Denver, studying with Dr. Sarah Pessin.

Nova Hall is a graduate of the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the West campus, with a Bachelor of Arts in Integrative Studies. Hall specializes in mixed media art which combines pop art and historical narrative.

Gerald Johnston is pursuing a Master of Arts in the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, Interdisciplinary Studies program. He is participating in a fall 2011 graduate course connected to the symposium theme.

Darren Kleinberg is pursuing a Master of Arts in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Religious Studies program. He is participating in a fall 2011 graduate course connected to the symposium theme.

Marie-Louise Paulesc is a doctoral student in communication, and a graduate teaching associate in the Hugh Downs School of Human Communication, at the Tempe campus. A student of Dr. Joel Gereboff, she has an interest in collective memory and the memory of communism in Europe and the Museum in Sighet. Her research interests are the public memory of Communism in Eastern Europe with an emphasis on the case of Romania. She has studied ways in which remembering Communism models the Holocaust remembering. In the Romanian case, the fact of this "modeling" occurs clearly in several instances but the parallels are significant for the entire context of the discussion about a "European memory." Her larger project examines broader parallels between Communism/Holocaust memory and their specific forms in the memory of Eastern Europe and Romania.

Yan Mann is a doctoral student in history and a graduate teaching assistant in the School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies at the Tempe campus, concentrating on the Soviet Union and the Eastern Front in World War II. He is originally from Chernovtsy, Ukraine and emigrated to the United States in 1990. He received his Bachelor of Arts and Masters degrees from St. Johns University and wrote his Masters thesis on the historiography of the Eastern Front in World War II and the defense of Novorossiysk in 1942. His current researc, titled "1941: Memory and Remembrance" tracies alternative narratives created around the events of 1941 and how various state administrations utilized them for their own needs, including foreign anddomestic policies, and how the public responded to an ever-changing narrative of events that, in many cases, they themselves experienced.

Richard Ricketts is an undergraduate student at Barrett, The Honors College at the West campus, pursuing a dual-major in Applied Ethics and Religious Studies. He currently works at the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict, and is the president and founder of the Philosophical and Religious Studies Society (PRSS) at the West campus. PRSS activities include the 2010 PRSS Spring Lecture Series (six events; two featuring internationally known scholars Joan Retallack and Alon Segev). His past work includes a research project for the Sun Angel Excellence in the Humanities Research Scholarship on his ethnographic work in the Amazonian region of Ecuador during the Summer of 2009; a fellowship with the Center for the Study Religion and Conflict and participation on a first place team in the Avnet Tech Games. Richard has been working closely with Dr. Patricia Huntington on the topics in Continental philosophy and religion.

Victoria Sargent is pursuing a master's degree in Interdisciplinary Studies at the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the West campus. She is currently working on a project on roadside memorials in Arizona, hoping to illustrate the cultural connection between Arizona, Mexico and Spain through their material culture.
www.myculturalresearch.com

Nathan Schick is a doctoral student in the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Religious Studies program. He is participating in a fall 2011 graduate course connected to the symposium theme.

Charles Williams is a graduate student in the New College of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences, Interdisciplinary Studies program. He is enrolled a fall 2011 graduate course connected to the symposium theme.